What happens at home does not always stay at home. For Arizona employees that suffer from domestic violence, work may be an escape or reason to leave a domestic violence situation, it still affects them in the workplace.

According to the US National Library of Medicine, a Canadian study found that employers lose approximately $77.9 million yearly due to domestic violence. Often those who experience domestic violence are more likely to have lower income and have a disrupted work history. 36% to 75% percent of workers experience harassment from their abusers while at work.

Employees who experience domestic violence have less focus, may experience more interruptions have to take time off regularly. Often, people perceive domestic violence as a private problem with implications in the home, rather than outside of the home. This is not the case. In fact, what happens at home often carries into other aspects of a person’s life.

Unfortunately, with the lower income disrupted work history, a person who suffers abuse may have more difficulty leaving the situation due to financial instability. He or she may be more reliant on his or her partner. In addition, his or her work history may make it difficult for him or her to acquire a better job. Often, domestic abuse suffers are more likely to have casual or part-time jobs.

In the United States, about one in four women and one in 10 men experience domestic violence at the hands of their partners, according to the CDC. This includes stalking, physical violence, psychological aggression and sexual violence. Victims are often fearful, injured, are more likely to miss days off work.