Sex crimes carry significant penalties, some of which last even after a person has served their time in prison. When a person in Arizona commits certain sex crimes against children, not only may they have to register as a sex offender, but it could even affect where that person is able to live.

One crime against children that could affect where a person can live is sexual assault of a minor. Under Arizona law, even after a person is convicted of this crime and is released from prison, they cannot live within 1,000 feet of certain places.

They cannot live within 1,000 feet of a school for kindergarten through twelfth grades (or any combination of these grades). They also cannot live within 1,000 feet of a child care facility. If a person breaks these laws, it is a class 1 misdemeanor.

There are some exceptions to these laws, however. These laws are not applicable to a person who established their home prior to September 19, 2007, or who established their home before the school or child care facility was built. These laws also do not apply to minors or to those who are currently under probation. In addition, these laws are not applicable to those whose civil rights have been restored per law. Finally, these laws will not apply to those who have not been convicted of a subsequent crime within the past 10 years, not including the time they were in prison.

While these laws are meant to keep children safe, they impose a restriction on a person’s freedom to choose where to live, even after that person has served their time in prison. While this may seem unfair, it is the law. Those who have questions about this law and how it might apply to them may want to discuss their situation with a criminal defense attorney.